FILMS

All royalties will be collected to support the various challenges of immigrant communities during these challenging times. Our general pricing regarding various licenses are: Educational (includes public performance rights): $380. High Schools & Volunteer Organizations (includes public performance rights): $180. Individuals: $24.95 For further information contact our production team: sharimstudio.com

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Songs That Never End (2019, 114min)

Director, Writer, Editor, & Cinematographer
Editing Team                                

Art  
Music

Website: http://www.songsthatneverend.com

Yehuda Shaim
Lorena Alvarado, Flora Sharim, Abbas Dayan, & Karla de-Jesus
Hussein al-Khudari
Federico Llach

Having fled their home in Iran, the Dayan family is greeted in Houston with hurricanes and perilous politics. Nine-year-old Hana is bold and brilliant and struggles to be heard while her family comes to grips with life in the sprawling Texan metropolis, constantly reaching out to all that is gone but is still here: a hunger for the future, and songs about a kind world.
Reviews:
"In “Songs that Never End”, Film artist and scholar Yehuda Sharim weaves a beautiful tapestry illustrating the beauty and bleakness in the lives of one refugee family, who are dealing with the trauma of escaping political unrest and persecution and finding themselves in the midst of an uphill journey to adjust to American life in Houston, TX. Although it’s easy to interpret Professor Sharim’s film as a glimpse into a refugee family’s daily travails, that take would be incredibly simplistic and unfair. What unfolds in this family’s stories are within-family struggles that are clearly microcosms of larger societal and cultural issues that each family member faces. Abbas is a loving father and husband, who left a well-paying, highly respected job in Iran who struggles to meet traditional expectations to provide for his family. He’s a poet at heart and the beauty of his poems is abrasive against life within the confines of his apartment. His wife, Samira is battling physical limitations but is also silently suffering from mental health issues while trying to care for four children, including twins toddlers. Yet, despite the hardships they face, the love they have for each other and their children are painfully clear as they recite Abbas’s poetry for the camera. Why is it painful? Because the viewer can imagine a time when life allowed them to express their love through the beauty of words and that picture is in stark contrast to the heaviness of their current life. Instead of poetry, Abbas’s gift of words now expresses pain, anxiety, and sadness."- Anna Song
"Songs That Never End deploys conventional film tropes in brilliantly unconventional ways. It is a tale of a family in jeopardy and a drama in which social difference functions as a source of both danger and refuge. These are familiar scenes in documentary cinema and fiction films. Yet this film has no linear progression from its opening to its conclusion. It has no obvious beginning, middle, or end. It offers no redemptive triumph or final tragedy to resolve the questions it opens up. This refusal of narrative or ideological closure works deftly to evoke the structures of feeling appropriate to a group of refugees who never find refuge, to exiles for whom exile never ends. It offers a story but eschews a plot because as James Baldwin once observed, a plot conceals but a story reveals.Despite its brilliant array of intercuts, changes in camera angles and distances, and visually appealing scenes, Songs That Never End demands much from viewers. It presents real-time demonstrations of boredom, exhaustion, and miscommunication. A cacophony of sounds inside a small apartment often makes it difficult to discern any one voice clearly. Characters reveal themselves slowly through representations replete with contradictions. It is a film about the struggle that compels viewers to inhabit the effect of struggle, rather than to pleasurably observe in others from a safe distance. It neither romanticizes nor dehumanizes its subjects, but instead presents them in all their complexity as products of a world in which major social systems are breaking down. The implied and inscribed maximally competent viewer of this film will display neither pity nor sympathy toward its protagonists, but will instead wonder how we can honorably and honestly accompany them."- George Lipsitz

[ff: 14th International Documentary Film Festival - Vienna, Austria...]
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Seeds Of All Things (2018, 94min)

Director, Writer, Editor, & Cinematographer
Editing Team                                
Art  
Music
Production

Yehuda Shaim
Abbigail Vandersnick & Micaela Sharim
Hussein al-Khudari
Abe Miller
Yan Digilov

Website:https://www.seedsofallthings.com
Amid the backdrop of a contentious presidential election, a health clinic in Southwest Houston is run by and for immigrants and refugees. A family from Iran is bound by love as they build a new home in the city’s most diverse neighborhood.

[ff: Equality International Film Festival, DOCfeed Film Festival in Eindhoven, Houston Iranian Film Festival...]
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Lessons In Seeing (2017, 99min)

Director, Writer, Editor, & Cinematographer
Editing Team                                
Art  
Music
Production

Yehuda Shaim
Abbigail Vandersnick & Micaela Sharim
Hussein al-Khudari
Abe Miller
Yan Digilov

Website:http://www.lessonsinseeing.com
When the elderly math teacher, Sibhatleab, ventures alone from a refugee camp in Ethiopia, he finds himself at the bottom rung of the social ladder in a vast, faceless Texan metropolis in the summer before a contentious election. As he still copes with his unthinkable twenty-five year history of imprisonment and torture, he finds hope at Salem Market, a tiny store that caters to Houston’s refugee community.  The film tells his story of disillusionment and resilience, questioning our understanding of the immigrant experience in contemporary America.

[Houston Black Film Festival, Awareness Film Festival...]
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We Are In It (2016, 107min)

Director, Writer, Editor, & Cinematographer
Editing Team                                
Art  
Music
Production

Yehuda Shaim
Abbigail Vandersnick & Micaela Sharim
Hussein al-Khudari
Abe Miller
Yan Digilov

Website:http://www.weareinitfilm.com
We Are In It features visceral scenes from the everyday lives of Karla, Serges, Hussein, Nancy and Tutu. For all of them, Houston is their common space of struggle, pleasure, and shelter. The city is a second, third or even fourth city of residence, both home and metropolis of hostility. Here, they are safe, restless, part of a diaspora that struggles to find meaning beyond labels of foreigner, immigrant, undocumented, alien, and refugee.

[Riverside International Film Festival, Houston International Film Festival, Gallup Film Festival...]
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